ECA Phase 3 Topic 8: Robot Arm

Today we built the robot arm, it is an arm that is controlled by pneumatics as much of our course has covered in the past. Most of the kids were not able to finish due to arriving late and the complexity of the build. As today was the last day of classes I hope all the kids had fun during Phase 3 and we hope to see them back for Phase 4!

Communication ECA Phase IV Class 7: Roaming Vehicles 20181024

This lesson will focus on arrays and how they can be used to control the actions of the students’ wheeled robots. Students will discover what arrays are, how they work, and why they are important in computer programming. They will also learn how to incorporate an array into their program.

The students are going to program their robot to move according to a recorded set of instructions given to it through the buttons on the EV3 Brick according to these parameters:

Program 1: Recording One Action to Make the Robot Move

  1. Start the program.
  2. Create a Variable Block called “Drive”.
  3. Wait for a Brick Button to be bumped.
  4. Play sound “Click 2”.
  5. Record the numerical value of the pressed button in the variable “Drive”.
  6. Wait for 2 seconds.
  7. Play sound “G02”.
  8. Read the number stored in variable “Drive” and send the value to a switch.
  9. Numeric switch:
  10. If Drive = 1, curve turn the robot left.
  11. If Drive = 3, curve turn the robot right.
  12. If Drive = 4, move the robot straight forward for 2 rotations of the wheels.
  13. If Drive = 5, move the robot straight backward for 2 rotations of the wheels.
  14. Play sound “Game Over 2”.

Program 2: Recording Several Actions to Make the Robot Move (Optional)

The students will use the “array operations” and “Variable” blocks to realize a function to first recording several actions and then drive the robot.

In an Array Operations Block, record the button press in the Value parameter, loop number in the Index parameter and variable name in the Array parameter. Write all the information from the Array Operations Block into the “drive” Variable Block.

PBP Phase 1 Combined Class 8: Free build and fishing rod challenge

Today was the last day of class and the students were allowed to choose between a free build or a challenge. The students who chose a free build came up with some incredible creations while the challenge team were all very good at coming up with solutions to the problem of lifting a water bottle with a fishing rod.

Thank you all for another wonderful semester and we hope to see you all again in January

Keep on dreaming!

Fishing Rod

This week we built a fishing rod. The fishing rod used pullies to extend and pull in the hook. I would really appreciate it if everyone stuck with their teammates because some people left their teammates to go and play. So, before you leave, please finish your project and make sure your partner is complete as well.

PBP Phase 1 Combined: Class 7: Walker

Today we built the walker and used the material that we learned in the past two classes about screws, worms, gears, and levers in order to make the walker walk. The kind loved playing around with their walkers almost as much as they did building them. I apologise for posting these classminutes late as my PC ran into a hardware issue and could not be booted until recently.

ECA Phase 3 Topic 6: Scissor Lift

Today we built the Scissor Lift and played around with them. The kids mostly finished on time and enjoyed the build however we did not have enough time to go in depth today. Due to issues with my PC I am sorry to have posted this Classminutes a bit late.

ECA Phase 3 Topic 7: Piston hand

Today we built the pneumatic hand and learned a bit about how pnuematics can be used to actuate devices, The students loved grabbing things with their grabbers and attempted to lift heavy weights. The topic for next week is a pneumatic arm.

Also sorry for the late Classminutes, my PC broke and I just managed to fix it.

Drag Car

Last week in class we built drag cars. This was a more difficult project, so I didn’t get time to go over the lesson. Essentially, the drag car is propelled forward by the spinning gear, which propels the car forward. When the button was pressed on the base, it connected the spinning gear on the base to the dormant gear on the car. The base was able to spin the gear on the drag car which continued to turn, propelling the car forward.

Communication ECA Phase IV Class 6: Cruise Control 20181017

During this lesson, the students gain a good understanding of the Variable Block. The students will use this information to create a cruise control feature for their wheeled robots. The students will utilize two Touch Sensors to control and maintain the speed of their robot. The students will need to program their robot so that, once moving, it can be sped up by pressing the Touch Sensor. Code blocks for controlling the Touch Sensor (wait) should be placed inside a loop.

The Variable Block is a programming block that can store data (text, logic, a numeric, or arrays), which can be overwritten at any time while the program is running. This block has to be read and then written to, using the Math, Text, or Array Operations Blocks.

Program 1: Increase Speed with Variable

  1. Start the program.
  2. Create a Variable Block called “Speed” and enter a value of 0.
  3. If the Touch Sensor is pressed:
    1. Read the variable called “Speed”
    2. Add 10 to the read value
    3. Write the result in the variable called “Speed”
    4. Read the variable called “Speed”
    5. Start motors B and C at a speed set to the value stored in the variable called “Speed”
  4. ELSE
  5. (Do nothing)
  6. Repeat steps 3a to 3e forever.

Program 2: Increase and Decrease Speed with Variable

With the first program written and the robot accelerating when the Touch Sensor is pressed, the students would extend the program to slow the robot down.

One solution could be to have a second unlimited loop similar to the loop used in the first programming exercise. This loop would use a different Touch Sensor port (another sensor added). The Math Block would be changed to subtract rather than add.

  1. Start the program.
  2. Create a Variable Block called “Speed”, enter a value of 0, and start two tasks.

TASK 1

  1. If Touch Sensor 1 is pressed:
  2. Read the variable called “Speed”
  3. Add 10 to the read value
  4. Write the result in the variable called “Speed”
  5. Read the variable called “Speed”
  6. Start motors B and C at a speed set to the value stored in the variable called “Speed”

ELSE

(Do nothing)

  1. Repeat steps 3a to 3e forever.

TASK 2

  1. If Touch Sensor 2 is pressed:
  2. Read the variable called “Speed”
  3. Subtract 10 from the read value
  4. Write the result in the variable called “Speed”
  5. Read the variable called “Speed”
  6. Start motors B and C at a speed set to the value stored in the variable called “Speed”

ELSE

(Do nothing)

  1. Repeat steps 5a to 5e forever.**

Program 3: Increase and Decrease Speed with Variable and Display

With the wheeled robot now accelerating and decelerating at the touch of a button (or two), students can extend their programming to show how fast their robots are moving. Students will use the Display Block to show this value in the Variable Block.

A new skill to be learned in this lesson is the creation of a My Block. Two of these can be seen in the solution below. My Blocks allow users to create subroutines of programs they have already written. In the case below, we have taken the acceleration and deceleration loops and created My Blocks from these programs. There are two reasons to do this: first to save space, and second to allow these subroutines to be reused in other programs.

  1. Start the program.
  2. Create a Variable Block called “Speed”, enter a value of 0, and start three tasks.

TASK 1

  1. Start My Block “Acceleration”.

TASK 2

  1. Start My Block “Deceleration”.

TASK 3

  1. Read the variable called “Speed”.
  2. Display the value stored in the variable called “Speed”.
  3. Repeat steps 5 and 6 forever.

Flywheel Cars

Today in class we built flywheel cars. A fly wheel is a device that stores rotational energy. The motions of the flywheels continue because of inertia. This allowed the car to move forward, even after the wheels have stopped! This was very enjoyable for the kids because they had an opportunity to race against each other. See you next week!